AVS

University of Queensland

Prof Alexander A Khromykh

BP03236

BSc (Russia) Physiology, PhD (Russia) Virology, Professor of Virology

Email: a.khromykh@uq.edu.au 
Phone: +617 3346 7219 
Web: http://staff.scmb.uq.edu.au/staff/alexander-khromykh
The main areas of research are molecular virology, viral pathogenesis, and virus-host interactions. The viruses studied are encephalitic flaviviruses, primarily West Nile virus, and alphavirus Chikungunya. The overall goal is to determine the mechanisms by which these viruses cause disease in the hosts and to identify viral and host factors determining the outcome of infection. The experimental approaches used include molecular manipulations with viral infectious cDNA clones and replicons, transient and stable expression of viral proteins and noncoding RNAs, viral replication and virulence assays, microarrays, mass spectrometry, next generation sequencing analysis, siRNA knockdowns, and knockout cells and mice. Together, these approaches allow detailed analysis of the effects of changes in the viral and host genomes that are likely to have a profound impact on virus replication and pathogenesis. 
 
Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre 
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences 
University of Queensland, 
Brisbane, 4072 
AUSTRALIA
 

Prof Paul R Young

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BSc (UQ) Microbiology, PhD (London) Virology, Professor of Virology


Email: p.young@uq.edu.au 
Phone: +617 3365 4646 
My laboratory employs molecular and structural biology based approaches in the study of viral replication and pathogenesis. Key steps in this process are in turn targeted for the development of improved diagnostics, vaccines and anti-viral therapeutic control strategies. Current studies are focused on three different viruses; dengue virus, a serious mosquito-borne disease in many tropical countries, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a major cause of hospitalization of children with respiratory infections and KoRV, a retrovirus of koalas which we have shown is currently invading the koala germline and is linked with high rates of cancer in this iconic species.
 
Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre 
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
University of Queensland, 
Brisbane, 4072 
AUSTRALIA
 

Prof Roy A Hall

hall

BSc (UQ) Microbiology, PhD (JCU) Virology, Professor of Virology


Email: roy.hall@uq.edu.au 
Phone: +617 3365 4647 
Web: http://staff.scmb.uq.edu.au/staff/roy-hall
A major theme of my research is viral discovery and epidemiology. This includes isolation and genetic characterisation of new arthropod-borne viruses and elucidation of their ecology, prevalence and pathogenesis. These studies have led to the discovery of several new mosquito-borne viruses in Australia and spawned major projects for the development of novel reagents and methodologies to enhance viral detection and diagnosis. Our investigations have special focus on a newly emerged, virulent strain of West Nile virus in Australia and the potential role of insect-specific viruses in regulating its transmission by mosquito vectors.
 
Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences 
University of Queensland, 
Brisbane, 4072 
AUSTRALIA

Dr Helle Bielefeldt-Ohmann

HBO 

DVM (Copenhagen) Veterinary Medicine, PhD (Copenhagen) Virology & Pathology, Senior Lecturer in Infectious Disease Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Science, and Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre

Email:  h.bielefeldtohmann1@uq.edu.au
Web:  http://www.aidrc.org.au/helle-bielefeldt-ohmann

Our main focus is on the pathogenesis and pathobiology of viral infections in the natural hosts and appropriate animal models. Current studies are focused on flaviviruses, mainly West Nile virus in horses and bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus, and on feline immunodeficiency virus. We employ molecular biology, proteomics, immunologic and conventional pathology methodologies to characterize disease processes and elucidate the pathogenesis of these infections. In addition, we conduct vaccine and molecular epidemiology studies of arbovirus infections in horses. 

University of Queensland
Gatton 4343
AUSTRALIA

Dr Tim J Mahony

Mahony BSc (Hons I) Biochemistry, PhD Molecular Microbiology, Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Animal Science, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture & Food Innovation

Tel: +617 3346 6505
Email:  t.mahony@uq.edu.au
Web:  http://www.qaafi.uq.edu.au/dr-tim-mahony 

My main interests revolve around improving viral disease control in production animals, particularly cattle and poultry. My group is characterising the molecular interactions between invading pathogens and the subsequent host responses with the goal of developing new vaccine and diagnostic technologies. A key component of this work includes improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin and drive viral virulence and evolution. We are using next generation sequencing to sequence the genomes of herpesviruses from a variety of species including, cattle, chickens, marsupials and crocodiles. My group is also investigating the role of viral encoded microRNAs in virulence, replication and disease development. My group was one of the first in the world to apply bacterial artificial chromosome infectious clone technology for the efficient manipulation of herpesvirus genomes. We are continuing to exploit this approach to understand gene function and the development of vaccines.

University of Queensland
Brisbane 4072
AUSTRALIA

Prof Ralf G Dietzgen

RalfDipl Biol (Tübingen, Germany) Microbiology, Dr rer nat (Tübingen) Plant Virology, Principal Research Fellow, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Affiliate Associate Professor, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences 

Tel: +61 7 33466503
Email:  r.dietzgen@uq.edu.au
Web:  http://www.qaafi.uq.edu.au//?page=157981

Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions

My research interests are in the discovery and biodiversity of genes, proteins and regulatory RNAs in plants and viruses and their interactions in agricultural systems. Increased knowledge of these molecular interactions will enable improved crop performance and better disease control. Special interests include the characterization of plant rhabdoviruses, dichorhaviruses and tospoviruses, virus diagnosis and molecular evolution, taxonomy of negative-sense RNA viruses, RNA silencing pathways for pest and disease resistance, and functional genomics and molecular markers in tropical horticulture.

The University of Queensland
Brisbane 4072
AUSTRALIA

Prof Sassan Asgari

Sassan BSc (Iran) Entomology, PhD (U of Adelaide) Insect Virology, Associate Professor of Insect Virology, Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, School of Biological Sciences 

Tel: +617 3365 2043
Email:  s.asgari@uq.edu.au
Web:  http://www.biology.uq.edu.au/staff/sassan-asgari

Our focus is mainly to investigate the role of small non-coding RNAs (such as microRNAs) as key regulatory molecules in insect biology and host-virus interactions. Using combinations of bioinformatics, microarray, and deep sequencing analyses of small RNAs, and molecular biology tools we explore the role of differentially expressed host microRNAs in host-pathogen interactions as well as discover and investigate the role of virus-encoded microRNAs in virus replication and host manipulation. The main host-pathogen systems explored in this lab include flavivirus-mosquito-Wolbachia interaction, baculovirus-host interaction, and ascovirus-host interaction. Our long-term aim is to reduce insect populations and transmission of vector-borne viruses.

The University of Queensland
Brisbane 4072
AUSTRALIA

Senior Lecturer Karyn Johnson

Karyn 

BSc (Australian National University), PhD (ANU) Virology, Senior Lecturer, School of Biological Sciences

Tel: +61 7 33651358
Email:  karynj@uq.edu.au
Web:  http://www.biology.uq.edu.au/staff/karyn-johnson

 

Insects are commonly infected with viruses. We study the interactions between viruses and their insect. Viruses and hosts are in a constant evolutionary arms race. The host evolves antiviral mechanisms to prevent virus infection, while the virus adapts to overcome these host responses. Insects are ideal hosts to understand both the host response and the virus mechanisms for controlling the host. My research group investigates the interactions between viruses and insects, primarily using Drosophila as a model. In this model we can control the genetics of both the host and the virus to tease apart the contribution of each partner to the interaction. A major focus is investigating the mechanisms and impact of Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila.

University of Queensland
Brisbane 4072
AUSTRALIA